Accueil > Français > Sites historiques, archéologiques et légendaires. > Les sites archéologiques de ‘Ōpūnohu à Mo’orea > ZONE ARCHÉOLOGIQUE AMÉNAGÉE EN 2017 > VISITE ARCHÉOLOGIQUE ET HISTORIQUE > VISITE ARCHÉOLOGIQUE ET HISTORIQUE

VISITE ARCHÉOLOGIQUE ET HISTORIQUE


Ici, de part et d’autre du chemin, vous verrez...

+ Here, on both sides of the trail you will see the remains of temple sites with stone enclosures and sacred Banyan trees. These sites are part of the ScMo-124 archaeological complex. It consists of 9 temples, 19 shrines with stone uprights, elaborate pavements, and a council platform. This (...)



Remarquez devant vous la vaste terrasse retenue...

+ Notice the large stone faced terrace in front of you. Excavations uncovered several hearths on this terrace. These included "grill-like” cooking features where hot stones were used to reheat or roast foods. It is likely that a pole and thatch cooking shed once stood here. Māʻohi kept cooking (...)



Le site ScMo-159 comprend 12 vastes terrasses agricoles...

+ Site ScMo-159 includes twelve large agricultural terraces cut into this ridge. Each terrace has a stone retaining wall like the one you see in front of you. The Māʻohi would have planted important food crops on these soil flats. Taro was planted on water irrigated terraces, while crops like (...)



C’est en 1960 que Roger Green a commencé à étudier...

+ Professor Roger Green started surveying and excavating the ‘Opunohu Valley archaeological sites in 1960. Since 1999, Professor Jennifer Kahn has continued to map and excavate the valley’s temples, houses and agricultural terraces. This map shows the high density of Māʻohi settlements in this (...)



Cet enclos de pierre délimite un petit temple familial...

+ This stone enclosure defines a small family temple. Like larger temples used by chiefs and priests representing specific communities, family temples were religious sites where the Māʻohi interacted with the gods and the ancestors. Such sites symbolized the families’ land ownership. It is (...)



Les fouilles ont montré que cette terrasse...

+ Excavations revealed that this stone faced terrace and pavement were used for food preparation and cooking activities, followed by celebrations. It was likely used by the families living in the upslope houses as a communal feasting area. Important life event rituals (birth and cutting of (...)



Remarquez les pierres disposées en rectangle...

+ Notice the stones arranged in a rectangular outline, this was the border of a pole and thatch house which formerly was constructed on this site. Archaeological survey has shown that over 63 round-ended and rectangular house sites outlined by stones are found in the valley, in addition to (...)



Cette maison, érigée vers 1600 était occupée...

+ The house was constructed around AD 1600 and was occupied by a Māʻohi family of moderate status. Excavations revealed that the interior of the house, used for sleeping, had a small hearth for providing light and warmth. The family baked and steamed daily meals in a large earth oven found (...)



Cette structure rectangulaire faisait office de zone d’activité artisanale plutôt que de lieu de repos

+ This rectangular structure served as a craft activity area rather than as a sleeping house. The interior was used for manufacturing adzes. Outside the house, the left area was used for fermenting breadfruit paste in underground pits. The right side of the house had extensive evidence for (...)



Cette maison de repos a été bâtie en 1450...

+ This sleeping house was constructed in AD 1450. A high status Māʻohi family lived here, including the headman of this extended family. A craftsman would have manufactured stone tools, particularly adzes, to the left of the house, signaling this family’s access to economic resources such as (...)



Des champs de taro s’étendront devant Atea...

+ Taro patches shall stand before Atea (the sky god)… Man shall eat the taro leaves and roots (Excerpt from chant entitled “Order Finally Established”, Teuira Henry 1928) For the Māʻohi, taro was considered the king of all root crops. Several thousand agricultural complexes for planting taro and (...)



Religion, rituels et agriculture...

+ Religion, Ritual, and Agriculture Tahitian religion and agricultural subsistence were closely intertwined in the pre-contact period (pre-AD 1767). The first fruits ceremonies, or offerings of tribute in connection with harvest period, were part of the seasonal calendar and held when the (...)



Les jardins māʻohi...

+ Māʻohi Gardens Before the arrival of Europeans, taro was, along with breadfruit and banana, the principal food of Polynesians (Petard 1985). In pre-contact times (before AD 1767) Māʻohi cultivated plants for eating, for economic, ritual, and medicinal uses. This restored garden sits on a (...)



Centres rituels et politiques...

+ Ritual-Political Centers At major ritual-political centers, Māʻohi constructed pole and thatch structures for economic, ritual, and political functions. Temples : Pre-contact Māʻohi temples were made of stone enclosures with paved courts. Elaborate forms had a raised stone platform (altar). (...)



Le complexe ScMo-106...

+ The ScMo-106 Complex The 106 complex consists of 2 temples (106A, 106J), several paved shrines with stone uprights (106 F, I, J, N, AI), elaborate pavements (Y) and a council platform (U). This complex represents one of the five main ritual political centers in the valley. Such centers (...)



La vie quotidienne dans la vallée de ‘Opunohu avant 1767...

+ Daily Life in the ‘Opunohu Valley Before AD 1767 Pre-contact (prior to AD 1767) Māʻohi lived as extended families in a single compound composed of sleeping, working, and cooking structures. Māʻohi families cooperating in food and clothing production. Principal residences, or sleeping houses, (...)



Le complexe résidentiel ScMo-170/171...

+ The ScMo-170/171 Residential Complex Before you are clusters of domestic structures were called ‘utuafare in Tahitian, referring to the houses (fare), the people residing within them, and the surrounding structures used for everyday activities. ‘Utuafare were composed of sleeping houses with (...)